A look at Portland District’s decision-making process

John Day Lock and Dam, located about 100 miles east of Portland, Ore., houses 16 turbines in its powerhouse. A study determined that up to half of them could be pinned and the powerhouse could still efficiently generate hydropower. (Corps of Engineers photo)

John Day Lock and Dam, located about 100 miles east of Portland, Ore., houses 16 turbines in its powerhouse. A study determined that up to half of them could be pinned and the powerhouse could still efficiently generate hydropower. (Corps of Engineers photo)

 

Portland District uses two different processes for making and implementing decisions: the Military Decision-Making Process, Troop Leading Procedures and the Project Management Business Process.

These methods help the District define the problem and the steps necessary to support the best decision before using our resources and spending our limited funding. This includes conducting deliberate and in-depth analysis of the operational environment, extracting important facts and assumptions from the analysis, establishing well-thought out criteria and developing alternatives.

Both MDMP/TLP and PMBP provide a process to complete an objective or mission with a desired end state based on the best available information prior to execution. The key to the successful implementation of these methodologies is the rigorous completion and review of the sub-processes in a systematic and iterative fashion. This ensures the best available information is consistently used in the next level of planning or execution.

The two figures below briefly show how both processes function. Portland District uses both processes in concert as it tackles challenges, accomplishes its mission or seizes an opportunity in support of our missions.

tmdmp-chart

pmbppdp-chart