Corps Message: Stop the invasion with boat inspections

Aquatic invasive species, like zebra and quagga mussels, create a mass of sticky threads that glue them to practically any hard surface: boat hulls, anchor chains, motors, wheel wells and even other organisms such as crayfish.

Aquatic invasive species, like zebra and quagga mussels, create a mass of sticky threads that glue them to practically any hard surface: boat hulls, anchor chains, motors, wheel wells and even other organisms such as crayfish.

Aquatic pests, both plants and animals, hitch rides around the country on trailered boats and other watercraft. Aquatic invasive species, like zebra and quagga mussels, create a mass of sticky threads that glue them to practically any hard surface: boat hulls, anchor chains, motors, wheel wells and even other organisms such as crayfish. If they spread to the Pacific Northwest, the threats to hydropower, irrigated agriculture, drinking water, recreation and salmon recovery will be immeasurable. Other invasive species are already in Oregon waters.

To halt the movement of these species around the country, boat and trailer inspections efforts are increasing in the region. You’ll see them this summer at highway rest stops. Do your part to protect our waters by thoroughly inspecting and cleaning your boat or trailer after every outing and before hitting the road.

CLEAN all aquatic plants, animals and mud from your boat, motor or trailer and discard in the trash. Rinse, scrub or pressure wash, as appropriate away from storm drains, ditches or waterways. Lawns, gravel pads, or self-serve car washes are best. Do not just check the obvious places; these pests can hide anywhere.
DRAIN your motor, live well, bilge and internal compartments on land before leaving the waterbody. For paddle boats, drain by inverting or tilting the craft, opening compartments and removing seats if necessary. Rinse or flush under flooring, at inflation chamber joints or other areas that can trap mud and debris.
DRY your boat between uses if possible. Leave compartments open and sponge out standing water. Find a place that will allow the anchor and dock lines to dry.

(Graphic image courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

(Graphic image courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)